Wardipedia – 76. Good night

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Good night

Night-time on wards can be relaxed and satisfying, or deeply fraught and disturbed. Many patients require high levels of care, there are many of the same tasks and challenges as earlier in the day plus many other duties and dilemmas particular to the night. Sleep being the obvious one.

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Wardipedia – 23. Media

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Moving images Introduction TV is a central, but scarcely considered and definitely under-developed ward resource. The telly can be a wonderful source of interesting, funny, important things to talk about, while the programmes are going on. And you can build on ideas stimulated by what’s on, to enjoy activities before, during and after the programmes. […]

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Wardipedia – 24. Wii and other game consoles

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Wii-habilitation Introduction Ge-Wii-atrics, Wii-habilitation… It’s not just the kids who are getting down with Nintendo Wii. Lots of wards now have Nintendo Wii machines, providing patients (and their visitors) with a delightful choice of entertainment, physical exercise and mental stimulation. One of the reasons why Wii is so great is that it can be used […]

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Wardipedia – 16. Spirituality

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Keeping the faith Introduction The varied and creative examples of how wards meet patients’ spiritual and religious needs (see below) illustrate that this is yet another area where inpatient staff try energetically to make patients’ admissions as meaningful and therapeutic as possible. These efforts are essential for reasons of: Therapeutic outcomes Regulatory compliance Safety Patient […]

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Wardipedia – 14. Multi-sensory

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The sense of calm Introduction There’s no lack of sensory stimulation on wards! But often the continuous presence of noise in particular, along with all the other stressors of ward life, makes it important to provide actively therapeutic and calming sensory experiences for patients. Sensory activities are particularly valuable when patients are in a highly […]

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Wardipedia – 67. Ward culture of empathy

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Tea and empathy Introduction Mental health inpatient care is rooted in empathy – the ability to share in another’s emotions. This is the personal quality, and professional skill, that is most cherished by patients (but sometimes difficult to maintain when under intense and sustained pressure). Arguably, all the 77 ideas have empathy at their heart, […]

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Wardipedia – 70. Comfort objects

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Touchy feely Introduction Cuddly toys, snuggly blankets, toys, photos, ornaments, clothing (eg fluffy dressing gowns), pillows…. Certain objects soothe, reassure and comfort us. They provide an emotional anchor to ‘feel good’ memories or associations, making us feel a little bit better in the here and now. Some of the classic features include soft, tactile, or […]

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Wardipedia – 71. Housekeeping heroes

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Making hospital hospitable Introduction The ward environment and services are major influences on the quality of inpatients’ stay. In appreciation of this, the Government has supported the introduction of ward housekeepers in mental health hospitals. Housekeepers, cleaners, domestic and catering staff are the unsung heroes of inpatient wards. They’re principally focused on the needs of […]

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Wardipedia – 05. Relational security

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Trusting safety Introduction Patients (like everyone including staff) are relational beings and have powerful feelings about and responses to other people. The impressively low levels of aggression and violence on wards (given their complexity, constraints and populations) is largely thanks to patients feeling listened to, cared for and safe. This in turn helps patients trust […]

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Wardipedia – 75. Reflective practice groups

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Releasing time to share That’s the gag, and the point really, in homage to the very excellent Productive Ward. It’s essential to release time for staff to share in order to cope with the emotional impact of all the time released to care. Reflective practice groups are a sanity-protecting opportunity for staff to express the […]

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